THE COLOR CODE BOOK

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Editorial Reviews. niticahonu.ga Review. If you're familiar with the Hippocratic or medieval Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month?. Dr. Hartman's book is wonderful. He is an excellent writer and presents his information in a positive format. I have used his Color Code with my teachers, when I. Start by marking “The Color Code: A New Way to See Yourself, Your Relationships, and Life” as Want to Read: When a friend suggested I read The Color Code, I was hoping to find my personality cast as a Purple. Unfortunately, Taylor Hartman limits his categorization of personality.


The Color Code Book

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WHICH HUE ARE YOU? The Color Code Personality Assessment is the most accurate, comprehensive, and easy to use personality test available. Unlike other . I ordered the book for my brother's wife as a gift. I was impressed with the price. I was already familiar with the Color Code, and wanted her to have an. Even if a person knows themselves already, this book will still tell them more about their personality (maybe even stun them). The Color Code.

To ask other readers questions about The Color Code , please sign up. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Mar 30, Russell Maag rated it did not like it Recommends it for: Folk psychology at its worst. Agressive poeple are really pushy? Truth be told I couldn't stomach finishing this filth. Pigeon-holing billions of individualities into four basic, color coded, types is the most stupid and irresponsible things i have ever heard of.

The next person who says "I'm a red personality, with a little bit of yellow in there! I guess that makes me a RED!! Jan 11, Kate rated it it was amazing. I'm making more friends than offenses when I apply this knowledge. His personality test is a potential guide, not a stagnant chart, to see where one's strengths may be so one can begin improving life step by step.

View 1 comment. Aug 22, Greg Vandagriff rated it it was amazing. The Color Code is one of the very few books that I've read cover-to-cover multiple times.

It's okay. I did the same thing at first. In fact I would say that it wasn't until I had read the book twice The Color Code is one of the very few books that I've read cover-to-cover multiple times. I would say that it wasn't until I had read the book twice, cover-to-cover, that I was able to fully embrace and understand the color code in its entirety. This is because there are a number of easily overlooked concepts and examples sprinkled throughout the book which I found crucial to recognizing how the color code applies in a variety of situations and relationships.

Too often, people flip to the quiz, don't read the instructions, answer the questions, then skip to their color's chapter without reading the rest of the book.

Then they attack the theory for being too simplistic, inaccurate, not accounting for change in personality over time, or trying to pigeonhole people into particular boxes. These individuals either haven't read the entire book or failed to understand it. On the other side of the spectrum, you have those who love their result and then use it as an excuse for not developing their personality or working on their weaknesses.

All of these are issues that are specifically addressed in the book; in particular, make sure that you fully understand the role of secondary colors in providing a uniquely nuanced personality, including weaknesses and strengths from other colors Chapter 9 , and the role of character in developing your personality as you age Chapter 4.

I've had a number of psychological profiles presented to me, but this is the only one that was able to help me understand WHY I'm so conflicted and how to better manage that conflict. This is the only one that actually told me who I am.

My advice? Read it carefully. Then start changing yourself, your relationships, and your life for the better. Jun 30, Jill rated it it was amazing Shelves: This book is great for understanding what makes different people tick, and how you can interact with all different personalities. I pick it up and read different parts of it all the time, and it really helps me understand how my personality can better relate to someone else and how they are perceiving a situation.

It's also lots of fun to take the color test with family members! Feb 22, Nicole Johns rated it really liked it. I was reading this book when I started dating Tony! I loved it. I totally gave him the color code quiz-it was awesome. I think that's what really made him think I was the one. View all 4 comments. Before you begin to read this lengthy collection of thoughts, just let me forewarn you that I am Canadian, but this book is American, so my mind was discombobulated and my consistency in spelling the word as either colour or color may be lacking.

I tried my best, but I can't be bothered to go back and check. I decided to read this after reading George J. Boelcke's "Colorful Personalities", which is a similar take on what is presented in this book. There are some differences, though. In Boelcke's Before you begin to read this lengthy collection of thoughts, just let me forewarn you that I am Canadian, but this book is American, so my mind was discombobulated and my consistency in spelling the word as either colour or color may be lacking.

In Boelcke's book, there are four colours: Gold, Green, Blue, and Orange. Boelcke says that we each have all of the colours to some measure, but we mostly operate in our two highest colours. Now, in Taylor Hartman's book, four colours are presented as well: Red, White, Blue, Yellow.

I quickly realized as I started reading that I had to discard my previous notions of colour profiling, and stop trying to line up the colours from the two books. The only colours that really line up are Yellow and Orange, and Blue and Blue and there are still differences between Boelcke's and Hartman's Blues. In his book, Hartman tells us that each colour is impelled by a different core motive: Red desires power, White desires peace, Blue desires intimacy, and Yellow desires fun.

I really wasn't sure that I agreed with a lot of the stuff when I started reading, but I decided to keep going and just take it all with a grain of salt. Some it was explained, and some of it I just don't take very seriously. I've taken the test three times now, twice online and once from the book, and I've gotten Red twice and Blue one time.

I don't know that I agree that personality is innate, and I really found it hard to answer the questions from a childhood point-of-view.

I don't really remember how I responded to certain things as a child, I don't think I act the same way that I did when I was a child, and I think that's why I got differing answers when I took the test more than once. I believe, after reading the rest of the book, that I'm probably Red with a high secondary Blue. I think that part of my confusion about my personality comes from the fact that my mom is most likely Blue, my dad is probably White, and my sister is Yellow, so I've grown up learning how to respond to a rainbow of colours.

I know I've consciously practised what Hartman would call "Blue" personality traits, such as sensitivity and compassion, and I related to a lot of White traits as well.

I haven't practised Yellow traits as much She is open-minded and adventurous, and I'm not as much that way. I tend to want to control everything. Another reason there was confusion for me was that you have to pay very close attention, read between the lines, and figure out what Hartman means when he uses certain words or phrases. For example, I didn't initially connect at all to any of the descriptions of the personalities. Reds come off as belligerent, unemotional control freaks, Blues are perfectionistic, over-emotional and sensitive, White people are lazy and non-committal, and Yellows are directionless rebels that can't focus their lives.

I really didn't connect at first to the Red "power" motive. As time went on, I began to realize that I think what he meant by power was more a description of a desire to control. He also said that Reds are very vocal. I'm not a very vocal person unless I know you well or feel very strongly about something.

I also grew up with certain people saying I was extremely controlling, I could confront friends if I felt their behaviour was unacceptable, and I got called a "drill sergeant" a few times throughout my life. One thing I thought was pretty ridiculous was Hartman's statement where he declares that if people want to get married without first taking the color quiz and determining their compatibility, it's their funeral.

I'm paraphrasing, of course, but to me that statement has almost zero merit. People have been getting married, working together, building friendships and getting along for thousands and thousands of years without the Color Code, and they will continue to do so for as long as there's human relationships to be had. Yes, I believe that when applied correctly, it can help ease major tensions between people who don't understand one another, and it's probably saved many marriages and other relationships, but let's not overstate its importance here.

Color Your Future: Using the Character Code to Enhance Your Life

I really believe the most important statement was made near the end of the book. I've had to send the book back to the library so I don't have it here to quote exactly, but it addressed the biggest problem I had before I started learning about personality profiling. Hartman basically says that the Color Code should never be used to limit another person or pigeon-hole them, and you should never use it to justify your own limitations.

I've known people who, when they've found out their color, decided to just say "This is who I am, I'm never changing, and screw you if you have a problem with it. Just because I'm Red doesn't mean I shouldn't constantly be working towards being a compassionate, open person, or that I shouldn't work on my Yellow traits so that I understand where my sister is coming from. Ultimately, it's an interesting concept, but take it with a grain of salt.

Make sure you read and understand everything, and don't just pick and choose what parts you're going to listen to, i. Start building your character so you can work well with everyone.

May 24, Kyla Harris rated it really liked it Shelves: Such a fascinating book! I loved learning about this in my Student Success class.

You learn about four main personality types; Red, Blue, White, and Yellow and what they're main motives are. It helps you better understand those around you and why they make the choices they do.

Because of this you can help grow your relationships, have better workmanship and helps in deciding a career choice.

I'd highly recommend this book if you're looking for a new way to look at the world around you: My favorite color is purple. My college colors, by lucky coincidence, happened to be purple and gold. My one-time pseudonym on the internet, murasaki , means purple.

Unfortunately, Taylor Hartman limits his categorization of personality to four colors: Red, Blue, White and Yellow.

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Not a single s My favorite color is purple. Not a single splash of purple. Forget your astrological sign, that you were born in the year of the dragon, even the Meyers-Briggs personality profile. Every personality type has good characteristics and every personality type has limitations. Set-Up The book has four parts: The reader must choose the quality among the four qualities for the one that best describes them. An example of one question is: For me, life is most meaningful when it a is task-oriented and productive.

Part I also explores the core motives behind the personalities and the behaviors they tend to exhibit. In Part II, The Colors , Hartman goes in depth through each color, listing strengths and limitations in bullet format as well as discussing certain characteristics. Hartman explains how a personality type tends to act as an individual, as a child, as a parent, in their careers, and much more. I find the lists serve well as a quick reference guide when attempting to identify the personality-color of someone I know.

In this section, Hartman also addresses secondary colors or personality types. Most people who have dominant characteristics of one personality type are rather easy to identify. Hartman delves into conflicts created by opposing personality characteristics as well as how some of these opposing characteristics can complement each other.

How to communicate with anyone using the Color Code

He also states up front that while some color combinations may be more conflicted than others, all combinations can have successful relationships whether professional or personal and offers ways of dealing with the various personality types. Hartman does this in essay format and with lists for quick reference.

Part IV discusses character-building. Each personality has good, limiting, and downright ugly characteristics that are not easy to own up to possessing. I am a mixed personality so I received a double dose of nasty-tasting medicine to swallow.

The main motive for a Red personality is power. Reds want to be in control. They tend to be good, productive leaders that are also selfish and insensitive to the needs of others. The core motive for a Blue personality is intimacy. Blues want to love and be loved by others. They tend to be nurturing and altruistic but also perfectionistic and controlling. The primary motive for a White personality is peace. Whites want harmony and peace and for everyone to just get along. While Whites are amiable and diplomatic, they tend to be lazy and bottle up grievances until they explode.

The core motive for a Yellow personality is fun. Yellows want life to be fun and exciting. While Yellows tend to be the life of the party and easy going, they are also irresponsible and emotionally shallow. I am a mixed personality: Blue is my dominant color along with the core motive of intimacy. Red is a close second with the core motive of power. The example Hartman used is that a Blue-Red will delegate a task and be cutthroat about getting the job done Red characteristic , only to feel guilty about it later Blue characteristic.

Hartman discusses some characteristics of mixed personalities. Blue-Whites and Red-Yellows are the most comfortable blends. Blue-Yellows and Red-Whites tend to vacillate between core motives from one moment to the next. White-Yellows have good people skills. My main gripe with this book is that not enough time is devoted to the topic of mixed personalities. Though I can read the sections on Blues and Reds to get a general idea, and the characteristics of each often apply to me, I would have liked more information about dealing with other mixed personalities such as my husband who is a White-Blue.

All the Colors of the Rainbow Hartman believes that each of us, no matter our core motive s , should strive to be a rainbow by becoming a more charactered person who replaces our limitations with the best traits of other colors. I haven't practised Yellow traits as much She is open-minded and adventurous, and I'm not as much that way. I tend to want to control everything. Another reason there was confusion for me was that you have to pay very close attention, read between the lines, and figure out what Hartman means when he uses certain words or phrases.

For example, I didn't initially connect at all to any of the descriptions of the personalities. Reds come off as belligerent, unemotional control freaks, Blues are perfectionistic, over-emotional and sensitive, White people are lazy and non-committal, and Yellows are directionless rebels that can't focus their lives.

I really didn't connect at first to the Red "power" motive.

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As time went on, I began to realize that I think what he meant by power was more a description of a desire to control. He also said that Reds are very vocal. I'm not a very vocal person unless I know you well or feel very strongly about something. I also grew up with certain people saying I was extremely controlling, I could confront friends if I felt their behaviour was unacceptable, and I got called a "drill sergeant" a few times throughout my life.

One thing I thought was pretty ridiculous was Hartman's statement where he declares that if people want to get married without first taking the color quiz and determining their compatibility, it's their funeral.

I'm paraphrasing, of course, but to me that statement has almost zero merit. People have been getting married, working together, building friendships and getting along for thousands and thousands of years without the Color Code, and they will continue to do so for as long as there's human relationships to be had.

Yes, I believe that when applied correctly, it can help ease major tensions between people who don't understand one another, and it's probably saved many marriages and other relationships, but let's not overstate its importance here. I really believe the most important statement was made near the end of the book.

I've had to send the book back to the library so I don't have it here to quote exactly, but it addressed the biggest problem I had before I started learning about personality profiling.

Hartman basically says that the Color Code should never be used to limit another person or pigeon-hole them, and you should never use it to justify your own limitations. I've known people who, when they've found out their color, decided to just say "This is who I am, I'm never changing, and screw you if you have a problem with it.

Just because I'm Red doesn't mean I shouldn't constantly be working towards being a compassionate, open person, or that I shouldn't work on my Yellow traits so that I understand where my sister is coming from.An emotion wheel can help you diversify what your characters are experiencing as well as the moods and tones you want to create for your readers. They often fail at seeing the positive side of life. It is far better to take a risk and be disappointed than to wonder forever what might have been.

Reds are logical ; they enjoy debating and they can be argumentative.

In fact, it was so successful that I instituted it in two more libraries in Florida schools—again with the help of staff and parents. Motives are our innermost reasons. They tend to be nurturing and altruistic but also perfectionistic and controlling. Lists with This Book. A friend of mine introduced me to 'colors' back in and I thought this would be a great book to read.

Part I also explores the core motives behind the personalities and the behaviors they tend to exhibit.